Yves Meyer - Abel Prize Winner Lecture

As a sponsor of the Norwegian Academy of Science and Letters, PGS has the pleasure of hosting an exclusive breakfast lecture by Yves Meyer, the 2017 Abel Prize laureate and the father of wavelet analysis.

This year the world’s most prestigious mathematics prize focuses on an exciting area where the advanced mathematics of signal processing is directly applicable to the world of seismic imaging.

Join us for breakfast, meet the great man and find out more. 

Breakfast Program - Wednesday 24 May

07:45 Registration and breakfast
08:10 Yves Meyer, Abel Prize Laureate 2017: The role of time-frequency wavelets in the detection of gravitational waves and in the Compression of Seismic Data 
09:00 Sverre Brandsberg Dahl, PGS Chief Geophysicist: Applied mathematics and supercomputers in seismic imaging
09:30 End of program

Contact: info@pgs.com

Location: Oslo, Norway

Venue: PGS, Lilleakerveien 4C, 0283 Oslo, Norway

Registration: Sign up here!

 

"Professor Meyer has been a visionary in a broad range of fields, including number theory and differential equations.  His fundamental work in the theory of wavelets has transformed the world of signal processing and has led to a myriad of practical applications."  -- American Mathematical Society President Kenneth A. Ribet (University of California, Berkeley)

About the Abel Prize: The Abel Prize was established by the Norwegian government in 2002 on the occasion of the 200th anniversary of Niels Henrik Abel's birth. The Abel Prize recognizes contributions to the field of mathematics that are of extraordinary depth and influence. The prize amount is 6 million NOK (about 750,000 Euro).

This year's laureate: Yves Meyer of the École normale supérieure Paris-Saclay, France was the visionary leader in the modern development of wavelet theory. Wavelet analysis has been applied in a wide variety of arenas as diverse as applied and computational harmonic analysis, data compression, noise reduction, medical imaging, archiving, digital cinema, deconvolution of the Hubble space telescope images, and the recent LIGO detection of gravitational waves created by the collision of two black holes.

Attendance is by registration only. If you would like to attend, please register here