New in OBN Imaging at EAGE 2020

In this last Industry Insights article for 2020, Andrew Long takes a look at ocean bottom node themes based on presentations at this year's EAGE conference.

The source and wavefield spatial sampling of towed streamer acquisition exceed that of ocean bottom node (OBN) and ocean bottom cable (OBC) acquisition, and the survey costs are considerably less. Nevertheless, the decoupled source and receiver locations, the flexibility of OBN deployment in certain environments, and the growing industry focus upon very low-frequency signals and very long offsets for FWI applications are motivating a growing market for OBN.

Andrew Long reviews some recent developments in the application of Full Wavefield Migration (FWM) and Least-Squares Migration (LSM) of OBN and OBC data, then shares a rather contrary perspective on receiver-side spatial sampling. He notes how FWM can exploit the decoupled nature of OBN receivers and may enable sparser (and lower cost) acquisition than is typical.

This consideration of sparse and/or irregular OBN acquisition geometry leads to a brief overview of several presentations given at the virtual EAGE conference in December that addressed the acoustic imaging of OBN data.

Read the full article in our Technical Publications Library

 Example of a point spread function (PSF) grid from a generic model representing towed streamer acquisition (top) and OBN acquisition (bottom). Single PSFs are shown in both the depth domain (x,z) and wave number domain (Kx, Kz). The cross-survey PSF (XPSF), shown in the far right, is used in the 4D joint reflectivity inversion. From Lecerf and Besselievre (2018), First Break.
Example of a point spread function (PSF) grid from a generic model representing towed streamer
acquisition (top) and OBN acquisition (bottom). Single PSFs are shown in both the depth domain (x,z) and wavenumber domain (Kx, Kz). The cross-survey PSF (XPSF), shown on the far right, is used in the 4D joint reflectivity inversion. From Lecerf and Besselievre (2018), First Break.